News

22-11-2005
Copenhagen Economics analyses the challenges for creating regional economic growth in the new Danish regions (in Danish)
The reform of the Danish public sector has lead to the creation of five large regions. Each region has established a Growth Forum (Vækstforum) tying politicians, businesses and regional knowledge institutions together in the challenge to create the best circumstances for regional growth. Copenhagen Economics was assigned the task of analysing the starting point in each region and pointing out the key strategic challenges in each region. To do so, we benchmarked each region on the four new growth drivers in the Regional Competitiveness Model and we mapped the growth and concentration of global industries in each region. The results are four summary reports setting the stage for the next phase of analyses and strategy development. National Agency for Enterprise and Construction; Growth Forum The challenges for growth in Region North Jutland The challenges for growth in Region Mid-Jutland The challenges for growth in Region South Denmark The challenges for growth in Region Zealand The challenges for growth in Region Bornholm A report for the area of Greater Copenhagen will appear here in January 2006. Further information: Mr Martin Hvidt Thelle
17-11-2005
The Economic Importance of the Country of Origin Principle in the proposed Services Directive
The Country of Origin Principle is the core of the provisions intended to eliminate obstacles to the free movement of services in the proposed Services Directive. In a study prepared for the United Kingdom’s Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Copenhagen Economics uses a unique quantitative framework for economic impact assessments to show that the Country of Origin Principle accounts for approximately 10 percent of the economic benefits from the proposed Directive. The associated employment effects are found to be less significant. Further information: Mr Christian Jervelund Read the full report
07-11-2005
Reducing administrative burdens boosts the economy
An analysis prepared for The Danish Ministry of Economic and Business Affairs (Økonomi- og Erhvervsministeriet) by Copenhagen Economics shows that whenever administrative burdens are reduced by 1 billion DKK, total value added rises by 1.4 billion DKK. Moreover, by lowering administrative burdens in one sector, firms in other sectors benefit through lower input prices. While at the same time, households benefit through both lower prices and higher wages. The analysis is presented in chapter 6 of Vækstredegørelse 05 published on 3rd November 2005 by The Danish Ministry of Economic and Business Affairs. Further information: Mr Christian Jervelund Read the full report "Vækstredegørelse 05" in Danish
02-11-2005
Competition between Danish and foreign power plants may be limited
A report (in Danish) prepared for Energinet Danmark by Copenhagen Economics shows that competition between Danish and foreign power plants may be limited even when there is spare trading capacity on international transmission cables. In particular, this situation arises when prices are very high on international markets as in the winter 2002/2003. It follows that Danish power plants possess a dominant position on the relevant market more often than previously believed and that the risk of abuse of dominant position is higher. Further information: Dr Claus Kastberg Nielsen Read the full report in Danish